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Water is the element of change.

Earth is the element of substance.

Fire is the element of power.

Air is the element of freedom.

comicsalliance:

GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE
By Andrew Wheeler
Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.

As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.

There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE

By Andrew Wheeler

Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.

As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.

There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.

READ MORE

comicsalliance:

GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE
By Andrew Wheeler
Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.

As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.

There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

GIRL FIGHT: THE MARVEL/DC RIVALRY FINALLY EXTENDS TO WINNING THE FEMALE AUDIENCE

By Andrew Wheeler

Marvel launches the eighth of its nine solo titles with a female lead in November with Spider-Woman #1, and the book sadly already has a cloud over it. A variant cover by master erotic artist Milo Manara stirred enough controversy last week to garner mainstream attention. The cover featured Spider-Woman with her apple-shaped butt raised high in decidedly unheroic manner. It was exactly what one would expect from Manara, who’s created a number of superheroine illustrations for Marvel, but the image suggested a particularly overt tone of sexual objectification that could alienate the sort of readers who attended the Women In Marvel panel at San Diego where the series was announced.

As far as I can recall, Marvel has more female solo titles now than ever before, with a ninth title, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, launching in December. On paper, that suggests a laudable effort to reach out to superhero comics’ growing and under-served audience of female readers. Yet the Manara incident serves to remind us that books about women can very easily be targeted to a male audience.

There’s currently an unspoken contest between Marvel and DC to see who can produce more comics aimed at a female audience. It’s possible the contest only exists in my head, as I’ve been keeping a tally of solo titles with female leads for the past several months — but I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that editors at the two publishers have also been keeping track.

READ MORE

lukia-lokelani:

What if..? xD I don’t even know what to say about it…
maybe I’ll do more of this :P

kaidonovskied:

MARVEL WOMEN present:

"My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit"
Flavia Dzodan 

ashietara:

Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan’s ALS Ice Bucket Challenge (x)

They are the literal best. <3

kaciart:

shygaladriel:

dreamadove:

jackunzeldrabblesgalore:

who-yawned:

IF YOU LOVE ANIMATION, YOU WILL LOVE THIS! One of the best edited videos I have EVER seen! The story goes so smoothly and character from your favorite movies make an appearance. The music just goes so well with the whole plot.

Why…why am I close to tears right now? Omg…

HOW IS THIS POSSIBLE? 

"If you love animation"? How about if you love stories??? This is one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen!!!

OMGGGGGGG *_____________*

Seriously, you NEED to watch this!

why-i-love-comics:

Batman & Robin #34 - “Ties That Bind”

written by Peter J. Tomasi
art by Patrick Gleason & Mick Gray

SCREAMING

yourtickettothemultiverse:

BRUCE, I KNOW YOU’RE NEW TO ALL THIS TRUTH THING BUT…

THIS IS NOT HOW ‘TELLING THE WHOLE TRUTH’ WORKS!!!

why-i-love-comics:

Batman &amp; Robin #34 - “Ties That Bind”

written by Peter J. Tomasiart by Patrick Gleason &amp; Mick Gray

why-i-love-comics:

Batman & Robin #34 - “Ties That Bind”

written by Peter J. Tomasi
art by Patrick Gleason & Mick Gray

grootsdabae:

How DC ends their movies:

image

image

How Marvel ends their movies:

image

image